Studying Your Language Audiences From Google Analytics With Google Data Studio

Languages can be difficult to decipher when you look at your Google Analytics. This is probably the least talked about subject.

If you think about it, this is a great way to find out their preferred language. I’m sure some are bilingual, but why not make better landing pages for your Spanish Audience?

By default, the browser languages look like this:

Anything that starts with “es-” is Spanish, and it goes even deeper. Es-co is Colombia, es-ec is Ecuador.

Different countries who primarily speak Spanish have their own words. I learned this from my friends when I lived in Miami.

We were at a restaurant and my Cuban friend said a word that offended our server from Mexico. There was no intent to offend, it was simply a normal word that Cubans use. In Mexico it’s a dirty word.

So if I was to break down the top to overall, that same data will look like this:


This is South Florida, so I went even deeper to see if pulling the actual areas would help:

It didn’t. It made it noisy, and they have too many vague languages.

Let’s dig deeper on the other one.

Notice the low VDP rate for Spanish? The VDP rate is simply users that navigate to any VDP themselves (not pageviews). 61% of them didn’t. Why? Well, we know Spanish is their preferred language. Maybe they can’t read English?

This is why it’s important to study this, especially if you have many Spanish speaking people in your PMA.

Remember, we can serve ads to people in these audiences, and we can remarket them as well.

If you have Spanish speaking sales people, here is a good strategy:

1) Launch a display campaign using the specific audience. Send it to a landing page that’s in true Spanish (or whatever language). Don’t embarrass yourself by using Google Translate. Have an actual Spanish person write the content. You can also remarket your current visitors that speak that language who visited your English site.

2) Don’t use your vendor because you don’t want all that “stuff” on the top. Use a company like Unbounce to make the landing page.

3) Get a phone you can pass around. Round robin it just like you do with your ups. Put that number on the landing page. Don’t send them to your phone tree. Remember, these people probably don’t speak English

4) Obviously you should have a contact lead on there, but most will call.

You will get more deals this way.

Here’s the case statement if you want to try this yourself:

CASE


WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "es.*") THEN "Spanish"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "en.*") THEN "English"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "fi.*") THEN "Finnish"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "pl.*") THEN "Polish"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "cs.*") THEN "Czech"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "he.*") THEN "Hebrew"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "tr.*") THEN "Turkish"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "sk.*") THEN "Slovak"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "bs.*") THEN "Bosnian"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "ru.*") THEN "Russian"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "hu.*") THEN "Chinese"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "ko.*") THEN "Korean"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "pt.*") THEN "Portuguese"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "zh.*") THEN "Chinese"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "ar.*") THEN "Arabic"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "fr.*") THEN "French"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "vi.*") THEN "Latvian"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "nl.*") THEN "Dutch"
WHEN REGEXP_MATCH( Language , "de.*") THEN "German"


ELSE Language


END

If you see another show up, simply add another line. There are so many different languages.